Suicide is a growing public health crisis and firearms are among the most lethal and most commonly used suicide methods in the United States. A multilevel approach for suicide prevention that addresses access to firearms can save lives.

Our firearm suicide prevention model applies the social ecological model and focuses on four levels of intervention (societal, community, relationship, and individual) to reduce access to firearms by individuals when they are at an elevated risk for self-harm.

Suicide by Firearm

Suicide by Firearm

More than 22,000 Americans die by firearm suicide every year – 61 every single day. Due to the high lethality and easy accessibility of firearms, firearms are used in half of all US suicides. In order to effectively reduce suicide in America, we must address access to lethal means.

Learn more about suicide by firearm »

State by State

Firearm suicide rates vary substantially between states. In 2017, the firearm suicide rate ranged from a high of 19.35 firearm suicides per 100,000 people in Montana, to a low of 1.85 firearm suicides per 100,000 people in Hawaii.

Click on a state below to learn more about state-specific firearm suicide.

Age-Adjusted Firearm Suicide Rate per 100,000

  • 0.00 to 4.80
  • 4.90 to 9.70
  • 9.80 to 14.60
  • 14.70 to 19.35

Alabama

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Alaska

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Arizona

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Arkansas

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California

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Colorado

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Connecticut

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D.C.

District of Columbia

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Delaware

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Florida

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Georgia

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Hawaii

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Idaho

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Illinois

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Indiana

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Iowa

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Kansas

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Kentucky

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Louisiana

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Maine

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Maryland

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Massachusetts

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Michigan

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Minnesota

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Mississippi

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Missouri

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Montana

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Nebraska

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Nevada

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New Hampshire

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New Jersey

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New Mexico

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New York

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North Carolina

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North Dakota

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Ohio

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Oklahoma

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Oregon

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Pennsylvania

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Rhode Island

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South Carolina

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South Dakota

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State

Notes

Tennessee

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Texas

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Utah

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Vermont

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Virginia

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Washington

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West Virginia

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Wisconsin

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Wyoming

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This page was last updated on August 1, 2019.